NOW AVAILABLE! ALCOHOL-FREE HALOG® SOLUTION

HALOG® CREAM (HALCINONIDE CREAM, USP) 0.1%

BIPHASIC SUSTAINED RELEASE FOR BUSY BODIES WITH SYMPTOMS ON LARGE BODY SURFACE AREAS1,2

Clock
Man juggling papers and laptop

Modern-day lifestyles mean that busy bodies must find time to balance managing their corticosteroid-responsive dermatoses with the demands of their day.

Patients experiencing the disruptive itch-scratch cycle of atopic dermatitis and eczema need a treatment option that keeps up with their lifestyles.3

Halog Cream tube

HALOG® CREAM HELPS STOP THE ITCH-SCRATCH CYCLE THROUGH AN IMMEDIATE-RELEASE SOLUTION PHASE AND A DELAYED-RELEASE SUSPENSION PHASE.1,3

Immediate-release solution phase

Halcinonide acts quickly to relieve symptoms of atopic dermatitis and eczema1-2

Delayed-release suspension phase

Halcinonide concentrations are steadily maintained over time2

 

STOP THE ITCH-SCRATCH CYCLE

Halcinonide acts quickly to reduce the itch-scratch cycle and help prevent further skin damage2,4

Maintenance of halcinonide concentrations over time can help prevent moisture loss associated with compromised skin integrity4

UNIQUE BIPHASIC SUSTAINED RELEASE PROFILE CONTRIBUTES TO TOPICAL EFFECTIVENESS BETWEEN APPLICATIONS1,4

Average Halog Cream concentration vs average fluocinonide cream Line graph

Head-to-head pilot study1

Up arrow, 6 hours HALOG® Cream maintained elevated levels of active ingredient through 6 hours.

Down arrow, 1 hour Fluocinonide cream 0.05% concentrations declined after 1 hour.

EFFICACY

CLASS 2 EFFICACY WITH CLINICALLY PROVEN RESULTS5-7

HALOG® Cream (Halcinonide, USP) 0.1% is an efficacious treatment option for corticosteroid-responsive dermatoses such as atopic dermatitis, eczema, and psoriasis6-8

Comparative clinical response bar chart

2 head-to-head efficacy studies

HALOG® Cream was proven to deliver overall superior clinical results vs fluocinonide cream 0.05%.6,7

In both studies, HALOG® Cream demonstrated superior efficacy compared to fluocinonide cream 0.05% after 2 and 3 weeks of continued treatment.6,7

The number of patients who responded better to HALOG® continued to increase in weeks 2 and 3 of the 3-week-long studies.6,7

See HALOG® Solution data for scalp psoriasis
Baseline
Male with allergic contact dermatitis on his back, treated with HALOG® Cream twice daily for 28 days.*
*Individual patient results. Actual results may vary.


Photographs courtesy of Robert G. Greenberg, MD.
Contact dermatitis Week 4
Contact Dermatitis Baseline
week 4

CONTRAINDICATIONS1
Topical corticosteroids are contraindicated in patients with a history of hypersensitivity to any of the components of the preparations.

ADVERSE REACTIONS1
The following local adverse reactions are reported infrequently with topical corticosteroids, but may occur more frequently with the use of occlusive dressings (reactions are listed in an approximate decreasing order of occurrence): burning, itching, irritation, dryness, folliculitis, hypertrichosis, acneiform eruptions, hypopigmentation, perioral dermatitis, allergic contact dermatitis, maceration of the skin, secondary infection, skin atrophy, striae, and miliaria.

USAGE

A class 2 treatment option without certain prescribing restrictions5,8,9

No restrictions based on8:

Left Knee

Patient Age

Left Elbow

Weekly Dosage Limits

Right Back

Body Surface Area

Right Neck

Application to specific parts of the body

Reinforce your decision to prescribe HALOG® Cream by writing DAW-1 every time.

Halog Cream tube
Potency differences can exist between generic corticosteroids and their brand-name equivalents.11

HALOG® Cream is a cosmetically appealing topical corticosteroid cream for large body surface areas2

  • Neither sticky nor greasy to aid spreadability2
  • Contains moisturizing ingredients to emulsify, soften, and lubricate the skin8,10
  • Dosing: Apply to the affected area 2 to 3 times daily8
  • Available in 60-g tubes

References: 1. Draelos ZD. Stratum corneum absorption kinetics of 2 potent topical corticosteroid formulations: a pilot study. Cutis. 2015;96(2):135-141. 2. Baum EW. Effectiveness and patient acceptance of halcinonide 0.1% cream in 216g jars for large-area steroid-responsive dermatoses. J Clin Aesthet Dermatol. 2011;4(4):29-33. 3. Harrison IP, Spada F. Breaking the itch-scratch cycle: topical options for the management of chronic cutaneous itch in atopic dermatitis. Medicines (Basel). 2019;6(3):76. 4. Bagatell FK. Halcinonide: a new potent topical anti-inflammatory drug. Cutis. 1974;14:459-462. 5. Ference JD, Last AR. Choosing topical corticosteroids. Am Fam Physician. 2009;79(2):135–140. 6. Close JE. Double-blind comparison of topical halcinonide and fluocinonide in the treatment of psoriasis. Int J Dermatol. 1976;15(7):534-537. 7. Sudilovsky A, Clewe TH. Comparative efficacy of halcinonide and fluocinonide creams in psoriasis and eczematous dermatoses. J Clin Pharmacol. 1975;15(1112):779-784. 8. HALOG® Cream and Ointment [prescribing information]. Cranbury, NJ: Sun Pharmaceutical Industries, Inc.; 2018. 9. ULTRAVATE® Lotion [prescribing information]. Cranbury, NJ: Sun Pharmaceutical Industries, Inc.; 2017. 10. Greenberg RG, Fowler J Jr. Biphasic release halcinonide provides immediate and sustained class 2 topical corticosteroid activity. Poster presented at: Winter Clinical Dermatology Meeting; January 14-19, 2012; Lahaina, Hawaii. 11. Stoughton RB. Are generic formulations equivalent to trade name topical glucocorticosteroids? Arch Dermatol. 1987;123(10):1312-4.

INDICATIONS AND USAGE

HALOG® Solution (Halcinonide Topical Solution, USP) 0.1%, HALOG (Halcinonide Cream, USP) 0.1% and HALOG (Halcinonide OINTMENT, USP) 0.1% are indicated for the relief of the inflammatory and pruritic manifestations of corticosteroid-responsive dermatoses.

IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION

CONTRAINDICATIONS

Topical corticosteroids are contraindicated in those patients with a history of hypersensitivity to any of the components of the preparations.

PRECAUTIONS

Systemic absorption of topical corticosteroids has produced reversible hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis suppression, manifestations of Cushing’s syndrome, hyperglycemia, and glucosuria in some patients.

Conditions which augment systemic absorption include the application of the more potent steroids, use over large surface areas, prolonged use, and the addition of occlusive dressings. Application to a large surface area or under an occlusive dressing should be evaluated periodically for evidence of HPA axis suppression by using the urinary free cortisol and ACTH stimulation tests, and for impairment of thermal homeostasis. If HPA axis suppression or elevation of the body temperature occurs, an attempt should be made to withdraw the drug, to reduce the frequency of application, substitute a less potent steroid, or use a sequential approach when utilizing the occlusive technique.

Children may absorb proportionally larger amounts of topical corticosteroids and thus be more susceptible to systemic toxicity. Administration of topical corticosteroids to children should be limited to the least amount compatible with an effective therapeutic regimen. Chronic corticosteroid therapy may interfere with the growth and development of children.

In the presence of dermatological infections, the use of an appropriate antifungal or antibacterial agent should be instituted. If a favorable response does not occur promptly, the corticosteroid should be discontinued until the infection has been adequately controlled.

Use in Specific Populations

Topical corticosteroids should be used during pregnancy only if the potential benefit justifies the potential risk to the fetus. Drugs of this class should not be used extensively on pregnant patients, in large amounts, or for prolonged periods of time.

Systemically administered corticosteroids are secreted into breast milk in quantities not likely to have a deleterious effect on the infant. Caution should be exercised when topical corticosteroids are administered to a nursing woman.

Adverse Reactions

The following local adverse reactions are reported infrequently with topical corticosteroids, but may occur more frequently with the use of occlusive dressings (reactions are listed in an approximate decreasing order of occurrence): burning, itching, irritation, dryness, folliculitis, hypertrichosis, acneiform eruptions, hypopigmentation, perioral dermatitis, allergic contact dermatitis, maceration of the skin, secondary infection, skin atrophy, striae, and miliaria.

Please see Full Prescribing Information.

If you experience any Adverse Events you are encouraged to report them to the Drug Safety Department at 1-800-406-7984 or email Drug.Safety@ranbaxy.com. You can also report to the FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088 or www.fda.gov/medwatch.